Posted by on Apr 23, 2012 in Monastery | 0 comments

Golden Buddha temple, Dambulla. Dambulla cave temple is really a World Heritage Site, located in the central area of the country. The Golden Temple of Dambulla is a vital Buddhist shrine and monastery.

Golden Buddha temple, Dambulla. Dambulla cave temple is really a World Heritage Site, located in the central area of the country. The Buddha statues have been in varying sizes and attitudes the biggest is 15 meters long. The Golden Temple of Dambulla is a vital Buddhist shrine and monastery. Dambulla is a sacred place because the second century BC. It’s earned the name Golden Temple due to the gilded interior.A sacred pilgrimage site for 22 centuries, this cave monastery, using its five sanctuaries, may be the largest, best-preserved cave temple complex in Sri Lanka. The Buddhist mural paintings (covering a place of 2,100 sq. m) are of particular importance, much like the 157 statues.

Golden Temple Dambulla Most Popular Tourist Attractions in Sri Lanka

A Brief History:

The rock of Dambulla may be the centre of the Buddhist cave-temple complex established within the 3rd century B.C. and occupied continuously even today. Its location has marked a transportation node between your Eastern and Western Dry Zones and between your Dry Zones and also the central mountains through the good reputation for Sri Lanka. The cave-temple complex is made with an inselberg or erosional remnant worth focusing on within the study from the island’s geological history. The 25 hectare site proposed for inscription includes proof of human occupation returning to the prehistoric period, such as the recently excavated megalithic cemetery at Ibbankatuwa.
They have experienced continuous use for more than 22 centuries, if this was occupied with a Buddhist monastic establishment, following a arrival of Buddhism around the island. Remains of 80 rock shelter residences established in those days on the website happen to be identified. Likely within the 1st century B.C., the uppermost number of shelters on Dambulla’s South face were changed into shrines. These transformations continued and were intensified between your 5th and 13th centuries: cave-temples were extended in to the sheltering rock, and brickwalls constructed to screen the caves. Towards the end from the 12th century, using the introduction by King Nissanka Malla of sculpture towards the caves around the upper terrace, echoing the rock carving which had preceded it, the caves assumed their present general forms and layout.
The following major phase of development happened within the 1700s when carrying out a long-standing tradition, top of the terrace was restored and refurbished. All the painted surfaces inside the caves were painted or overpainted inside a style sign of the Kandy school from the late 1700s. In those days, the modest Buddhist figures within the caves were repainted, maintaining original details and iconography; the fronting screen walls were rebuilt and roofed to create an outer veranda. Through the 1800s, following a lack of royal patronage in 1815, periodic repainting of sculptures and deteriorating surfaces continued. In 1915, because of the efforts of the local donor, cave no5 was entirely repainted. As well as in the 1930’s, the veranda was rebuilt incorporating a combination of European and Asian detailing, and also the complex’s entrance porch was reconstructed inside a conjectural 18th c. style.

What to See

The three earliest caves would be the most widely used because they are more sizable and also the workmanship that went into them is clearly of superior merit. The biggest could well be “Maharaja Lena” (The Cave of the great Kings). With nearly 60 statues of Buddha (70 % which show him in the typical state of repose) it’s also be a site for Hindu worship with statues of Vishnu and Saman as well as for honoring the great Sri Lankan kings King Nissanka Malla and King Vattagamani. It’s from all of these two monarchs and benefactors the cave is known as. There are many scenes in the lifetime of Siddhartha Gautama adorning the walls along with a grand figure of him after his enlightenment carved in the rock from the walls. Another magnificent feature may be the natural spring that seeps water in to the roof from the cave. Many believe this water has mystical healing powers making trips towards the Golden Temple for any drop of their magic.

In “Devaraja Lena” (The Cave from the Divine King) is definitely an enormous almost 50 foot long statue hewn from the cave wall of Lord Buddha laying on his right side to get his many worshipers. Through the head is really a lovely figure from the Hindu god Vishnu (who’s credited with creating the caves) and also at his feet is Ananda, Buddha’s favorite student. In the entrance to Devaraja Lena may be the story from the origins from the monastery designed in the traditional Brahmi language. The 3rd cave, “Maha Alut Vihara” (The Great New Monastery) was decorated within the late 1700s underneath the direction of King Kirti Sri Rajashinha (an excellent follower of Buddhist tradition) within the style popular with the residents of Kandy (a populous city in the heart of Sri Lanka). There’s a statue of King Rajashinha together with 50 plus figures of Buddha created according to his instructions.

Just beneath the golden statue and environmental landscaping displays, a contemporary museum displays the recent past of Sri Lankan Buddhist culture. Architect of the magnificent new addition, which attracts million of local and international visitors, is Ven. Inamaluwe Sri Sumangala Thero. Dambulla is a sacred place because the second century BC. It’s earned the name Golden Temple due to the gilded interior.

Best time for you to visit

Dambulla’s weather conditions are fairly temperate throughout every season, without extreme variations, therefore it doesn’t really matter when you are. However, should you prefer to steer clear of the monsoons; don’t use May-August or October-January, because this is time for heavy rain.